REVIEW: Wicked (Apollo Victoria, West End)

Rating: ★★★★★
Quick Summary: “I couldn’t be happier” to tell you to get to your nearest showing of Wicked as soon as you can! You will be “changed for good.” 

Rating: ★★★★★
Quick Summary: “I couldn’t be happier” to tell you to get to your nearest showing of Wicked as soon as you can! You will be “changed for good.”


Wicked the Musical is an adaptation of the Gregory Maguire novel Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, which is, in turn, a retelling of the timeless Wizard of Oz. Wicked is currently showing at the Apollo Victoria, London, the Gershwin Theatre, New York and is also on tour in the U.K. and U.S.


T H E   S H O W

I am not ashamed to admit I have seen Wicked a fair few times. The ticket prices are reasonable, the London theatre is near accessible train and bus stops; but most of all meaningful friendships, vocal riffs, and a girl overcoming her bullies and critics all mesh together into this green, glittery, wonderful atmosphere that is not to be missed.

Part of the allure of the show is that it is a retelling of The Wizard of Oz, the children’s novel written by L. Frank Baum. It is interesting and thought-provoking to see scenes you know so well flipped on their heads, and have all your preconceptions of characters snubbed. You see the back story to well-loved characters from the Wizard of Oz, such as the Scarecrow, the Lion and the Tin-man, meaning you leave the show with the satisfied feeling of knowing the world of Oz better than when you came in.

The true pièce de résistance of Wicked, however, is the friendship between Elphaba and Glinda. We follow the two witches through their schooldays at Shiz University and into the rest of their lives, which are changed “for good” because of each other. Throughout the show, you see them love and loathe each other, and fight for and against each other. It is a very wholesome experience to watch these two women figure their way out through the highs and lows of friendship.


T H E   C A S T

Now. Believe me when I say you need to get to the Apollo Victoria as soon as you possibly can to witness Alice Fearn’s performance of Elphaba. She completely captures Elphaba’s desire to succeed, explosive, gritty personality and enduring determination for good. This coupled with her stellar vocal performances make her an awe-inspiring Elphaba. The reaction from the audience after key songs (“The Wizard and I”, “Defying Gravity,” “No Good Deed”) is electrically charged. There is something about watching a performer completely encompass the character and give everything she has got to the audience that revitalizes and reawakens you: this is what Fearn gives to every single audience member in that theatre.

Sophie Evans, who has also played the role of Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz, takes on the task of the popular, enterprising Glinda. She captures the nuance of Glinda perfectly and especially comes alive in the more politically charged Act 2. The vivacity in her characterization is palpable, and there are moments during “Thank Goodness” and the Finale where her performance is tear-jerking. Bubbly, funny and unafraid to show the darker sides of Glinda, Evans was made for this role.

Other key performances came from Tom Hargreaves as Fiyero and Rosa O’Reilly as the Wicked Witch of the East, Nessarose. Both have strong and engaging voices which make you empathize with their characters on their journey’s through the show. Their interactions with the Good and Wicked Witches not only bring dimension to their own characters, but also to that of Elphaba and Glinda.


T I C K E T S

As I mentioned before, the tickets for Wicked are very reasonable. If you book well enough in advance, you can get tickets in the stalls for around £30 and £22 for the circle.

If it is your first time seeing the show, I do recommend spending the little bit more money for stalls tickets so you can fully see the facial expressions and all the little intricate details. However, the audio and views in the circle are still pretty good, so for £22 you will still get a very good show experience.

Day tickets
Are you a student? If you tip up at the box office on the day of the show you can purchase the best available ticket for only £29.50. Just remember to bring your student ID card.

There are also day tickets for the general public at £29.50 (again go to the box office on the day; it is first come first serve) and concession tickets at £32.00

If you have seen Wicked, share your experience in the comments, or on The Rosie Word Instagram!

Rosie x

The current cast of Wicked on the West End:
Elphaba – Alice Fearn
Glinda – Sophie Evans
Fiyero – David Witts
Madame Morrible – Melanie La Barrie
The Wizard – Andy Hockley
Doctor Dillamond – Chris Jarman
Boq – Jack Lansbury
Nessarose – Rosa O’Reilly

REVIEW: School of Rock

Rating: ★★★★
Quick Summary: Young or old, Stick It To The Man, and go and see the feel good, uplifting and energetic School of Rock.

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My Dad and I at the end of the show

School of Rock is an adaptation of the 2003 comedy film of the same name starring Jack Black. The musical is written by Andrew Lloyd Webber (composer), Julian Fellowes (playwright) and Glenn Slater (Lyricist), and is currently showing at the Gillian Lynne Theatre in Drury Lane, London. 


T H E   S H O W

I first saw this show earlier this year, and alongside the ingenious fusion of rock, musical theatre and classical music influences, it was the vivacity and youthfulness of the cast that really stood out to me. I got the opportunity to take my Dad to see the show yesterday, and I knew he would love it simply because of the music; the show is saturated with nods to great rock songs such as Smoke on the Water, Satisfaction, as well as the rock concept album The Myths and Legends of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. 

The thought that my Dad actually came away from the show with went beyond noticing the obvious witty and comically written play, and great integration of well-known and loved music into the score. The overriding feeling that you get coming away from this show is one that is relevant at any and every stage of your life: don’t get tied down by other people’s limiting beliefs. This can be from something as small as whether you read Vogue or Sports Illustrated, as Billy has to choose, or as big as whether you compete in Battle of the Bands or not. The positive message of “You Do You” is woven tightly throughout the whole show.

The only reason I gave this show 4 stars as opposed to 5 was that by the end, I did start to feel quite tired. I was sitting 4 rows from the front (I talk about ticket details later on), and so the noise levels were high throughout. HOWEVER, this is a tiny, tiny point and generally did not detract from the experience.


T H E   C A S T

Obviously, if you are going to see School of Rock then you are expecting a bunch of talented kids – and I can tell you, they do not disappoint! With cheesy over-acting thrown out of the window, the child cast of this production provides stellar vocal performances mixed with a convincing awareness of themselves and what they are trying to say. The harmonies in songs such as ‘Horace Green Alma Mater’ and ‘If Only You Would Listen’ highlights their cohesion and commitment.

I could not write a review on School of Rock without mentioning the musical talent of the kids in this production that I feel is unmatched on the rest of the West End. As Andrew Lloyd Webber announces over the loudspeaker at the beginning of the show, the children play all of their own rock instruments. The best moment in the show to demonstrate this is in the final song where the pit musicians all stand up and watch the show alongside the audience, as the children in the show alongside their mentor fake-teacher Dewey Finn rock their way through ‘Stick It To The Man’ and ‘Teacher’s Pet’, full of guitar, keys, drum and bass solos, bringing the audience to its feet. The musicality and finesse in their playing is professional in its standard.

The standout vocal performance came from the shy but brilliant vocalist Tomika, played by Fayth Ifil, who performed a rendition of Amazing Grace full of innocence and killer riffs to prove she can sing, which induced a thunderous applause from the audience. Also highly notable was the bossy and indignant Summer, played by Freya Yates, who was very impressive in her ‘Time To Play’, hitting a belted Db at the end of the song.

Among the adults, both Craig Gallivan (down-and-out amateur rock star, Dewey Finn) and Rosanna Hyland (music lover turned uptight Headmistress, Rosalie Mullins) had fantastic performances. Rosanna Hyland’s ‘Where Did The Rock Go?’ was full of emotion, bite and effortlessly clear top notes. Her rendition of Queen of the Night was unassuming and highly enjoyable. Craig Gallivan’s Dewey Finn was hopeful, uplifting and unfailingly energetic, all matched by his perfect diction and fantastic voice.

Side note, the cast is changing on 22 August. Details can be found here


T H E    T H E A T R E

As far as the theatre itself goes, the Gillian Lynne Theatre is modern, spacious and well designed. No matter what seat you go for, you generally won’t get a bad one as the stage is so wide that you can see from most angles. From the furthest to the side in the front row, you will see the whole width of the stage, albeit with a few missing spots deeper into the set. The seating at the back of the stalls and the upper circle is well rigged so that you can easily see over the people in front of you, and don’t have any of those “back-of-the-head” viewing moments.


T I C K E T S

The prices for this show are fairly reasonable if you are savvy when buying your tickets, and the show is absolutely worth the price. If you buy in advance (and maybe get matinee tickets) then you could easily spend a maximum of £35 a head in the stalls, which for a West End show is pretty good – I was seated 4 rows from the front with excellent views in seat D52, on a Saturday matinee performance for £35 per ticket.

The School of Rock website tells you the best dates with the best prices, so this is a great website to use.  Also don’t be afraid to be seated slightly to the side of the theatre, as the view is very rarely compromised!

Top tip: if you are over 5’4″, then a great cheaper ticket to get is in the front row of the upper circle. It is advertised as ‘restricted view’ because of a barrier and lighting rig that hangs over the front of the upper circle, but for anyone over 5’4, this does not obstruct at all, and the leg room is great!
If you’ve seen School of Rock, share your experience either in the comments or on our Instagram page!

Rosie x

REVIEW: The Book of Mormon

Rating: ★★★★★
Quick Summary: The man sat next to me turned to his girlfriend at the interval and whispered “I think I just wet myself a little bit.” Enough said.

So. ‘The Book of Mormon’. Obviously, this show has had rave reviews all over the board, and the prices are pretty steep, so my expectations were HIGH.

‘The Book of Mormon’ is playing at the Prince of Wales theatre in London, just off Piccadilly Circus. My seat was C7 of the circle, which cost me £59.75. Considering this was one of the cheapest tickets for the show, I was expecting it to be one of the cheaper views of the show; i.e. visibility would be ok, but not anything special. However, the circle seating is really steeped, and so the view from any of the seats is pretty fantastic. You can see the whole depth and width of the stage from this seat, and I can imagine that the view is clear from most seats. Not to mention, the people sat in front of you are not an obstruction in the slightest.

Also, if you are a massive music nerd like me, then from these seats you can see directly into the pits, which is a nice little perk.

Finally, in terms of the theatre, I feel like I have to mention how ridiculously nice the staff at the Prince of Wales were. I know that most theatre staff are friendly, but the Prince of Wales staff were above and beyond in their customer service.

T H E S H O W

In terms of the show in general, I feel that everyone knows that it is funny. It is hilarious. However, what I wasn’t quite anticipating was how cleverly funny it is (then again, coming from South Park’s Trey Parker and Matt Stone, alongside Robert Lopez, we would expect nothing less.)

The musical takes an abundance of hard-hitting topics, such as the HIV/AIDS epidemic, gender inequality, race, oppression of the LGBT community, finding purpose in your life, and mental health, and talks about them in a comedic light. This is so important, because comedy is inherently accessible, and so talking about these crucial topics through comedy brings them to the surface in pop culture conversation. Not only does it bring them to the surface, but it also starts to shave away the taboos surrounding them.

If you’re not in it for the philosophies behind the comedy, then you can still get so much out of the play because of the combination of slapstick comedy, dry and witty humour, and impeccable comedic timing.

T H E C A S T

The cast currently on the West End are also massive contributors to the success of the show. Because the Andrew Rannells/Josh Gad interpretation is so distinct, and is the sound that people generally associate with ‘The Book of Mormon’, I think it is quite difficult to have an authentic voice and sound in the parts of Elder Kevin Price and Elder Arnold Cunningham. Having said this, Dom Simpson (West End debut) and J. Michael Finley (West End debut) do an incredible job of bringing something new to the roles. The characters are cheesy, and sometimes the ‘typical showy broadway actions’ sway slightly towards being annoying, but the delivery of the characters was so convincing I really didn’t care. The fact that Dom Simpson is only 2 years out of training, and playing this large role at such a high standard is testament to his talent and hard work. Another notable performance was Leanne Robinson as Nabulungi (West End debut). Her vocals were edging towards perfect, with an amazing flexibility and tone control, especially in “Hasa Diga Eebowai” (Reprise)”, is really admirable.

T H E P R I C E

One downside of the show is that it is pretty expensive. I went on my own (I’m super cool and really enjoy going to shows on my own) but if you were paying for two of you, or for a whole family, the prices start to pick up. It is not as expensive as Hamilton, but generally you would only get tickets below £50 at the back half of the circle, which is quite steep and potentially not ideal for vertigo sufferers. I would say either queue for returns or book at least 12 weeks in advance because then you’ll avoid booking fees. Although it is expensive, the quality of the day/night out you will get from it is well worth the money, in my opinion.

Another note is that if you have youngish children/you’re offended by strong language, there is very strong explicit language in the show, quite consistently.

Overall, the show is hilarious. But, more than that, there is an overriding positive message throughout the show, and it touches on some really important societal topics, and is the sort of show that keeps your brain ticking as you keep noticing and remembering things days later. I have a friend who said she knew someone who didn’t want to see it because they thought it was anti-Christian. My message regarding this is absolutely don’t rule it out because of preconceptions you might have. The play undoubtedly is using Mormon practice as a means for comedy, but also it acknowledges positive sides of religion, such as how it can help people, and give them hope.

Just go and watch it.

The current cast of The Book of Mormon on the West End features Dom Simpson as Elder Price, J. Michael Finley as Elder Cunningham, Leanne Robinson as Nabulungi, Steven Webb as Elder McKinley Richard Lloyd King as Mafala Hatimbi, and Michael Moulton as the General.

Rosie x