REVIEW: Three Dark Crowns

Quick summary: Dark, savage and mesmerising. 
Rating: ★★★★★
Try this series if you like: V.E Schwab, Neal Shusterman and Susan Dennard.


Read the full synopsis here

I bought and finished this book in two evenings worth of reading. The transitions between the points of view of the three sisters keeps you flipping the pages because you want to see what happens to the character after you’ve left them, and the more Blake unfurls tiny nuggets of information about each character, the more you are desperate to get to the next big reveal. I loved this book, and can’t wait to get into the next books in the series! I would also like to note at this point that I think Kendare Blake is exceedingly awesome, not least because her pets are called Tyrion Cattister, Obi-Dog Kenobi, Agent Scully and Armpit McGee. 

There is brutality and the promise of violence dripping off every page of this book – the very premise of it is that these three sisters have to attempt to kill each other to win the crown. Kendare Blake presents romantic, platonic and familial relationships, all while asking how much a person has to do before you can’t forgive them anymore, and questioning what truly makes a family. This exploration of human relationships is a real highlight of the book. 

The character development in Three Dark Crowns was also interesting and well thought out. At first, admittedly, it is confusing because there are lots of characters, and as it hops between the three queens, you don’t really get time to sit and figure it out as the plot unfolds. I also worried that there wouldn’t be enough development of the queens because it hopped between them so much. In the end, I didn’t see this as much of a problem, because the key characters came up often enough that you recognised them and the queens did get enough air time to give us an insight into their characters. As the book progresses, Blake cleverly weaves the personalities of the three sisters into your heart, and you soon realise you would be devastated for any of the three to die.

One thing I would have liked to have seen more of in the book would be a bit more world development. I am a sucker for knowing all of the little cultural details about the world I’m reading about, and I feel that this was the only element lacking ever so slightly from this book. Of course, this is only the first book and as I progress through the series I may get more insight into the world. There were some details, such as the Naturalist hunt, which were lovely, and ultimately it just comes down to personal preference. In my opinion, it does not take away from the overall success of the book at all. 

To summarise, I thought this book was great! Blake’s plot and character writing are fantastic, and she really keeps you on your toes the whole time. For anyone tempted to put the book down and not finish it (I see you, DNF’s…) I definitely say even if you struggle at the start of book, definitely push on because the final third is particularly good – the plot twists are spectacular and the character writing starts to really come to fruition. Three Dark Crowns is dark, savage and mesmerising. Give it a read. 

 

Rosie x 

REVIEW: The Remnant Chronicles (Series)

Quick summary: Marmite series. I loved it, some people hate it, everyone should try it. 
Rating: ★★★★☆
Try this series if you like: Laini Taylor, Veronica Roth & Holly Black


Check out the full synopsis here

We have three main points of view in this series; Lia, Rafe and Kaden, and the transitions between the POV’s are pretty seamless. The thing that really drew me to the series in the first place is that for a substantial part of the first novel, we know that Lia is being hunted by an Assassin and a Prince, but we don’t know which of the two men is which. There is a big sense of intrigue throughout the series, and I personally think this makes up for the fact that there is less magic present throughout than you might expect for a fantasy series. 

As far as the character of Lia goes, it is a nice touch that her true skills come in language and social interaction. In an almost feministic statement, Lia wants to change her fate, and show the men around her that she should be allowed to make her own choices. She is a headstrong dreamer, with a capability to lead and change the world for the better.  All of these qualities are a fantastic combination for the protagonist of a YA Fantasy series. 

There is a love triangle in these books. Now, I know many people who hate love triangles with a fervent passion, and all I can say to these people is that you will probably not enjoy this love triangle any more than other love triangles. It is pretty subtle and non-intrusive as triangles go, but if we’re honest it doesn’t have anything on the Mark-Kieran-Cristina steamy triangle of The Dark Artifices. I was reasonably satisfied with the ending, because I felt it did reflect the state of the characters in the books, and wasn’t too abrupt. 

The plot of the first book of this series, The Kiss of Deception, gets very mixed reviews, especially in the Goodreads comments. Some readers loved the slow-paced, gentle dreams of Lia, our main protagonist. Others, however, felt that for a series described as high fantasy, there was not enough action, adventure or plot interest. For me, I stand with the lovers of Lia’s quiet dreams. She is a princess who spent her whole life surrounded by the promise of magic, war and kingdom, and when old enough faced the threat of being married off to a man she didn’t know or love as a political pawn. I think it is very plausible that she would want a quiet, understated life after that. Although I understand the argument that the sleepy seaside town scene goes on for potentially too long, I didn’t find myself bored, and by the second and third books the scene wildly changes. 

To summarise my views of this series; I liked it. It had some interesting plot points, I loved the inclusion of language, I didn’t hate the love triangle, and I really enjoyed Pearson’s treatment of magic. I feel some people will love it, some people will hate it, and that’s ok, but I do recommend reading it! 

Rosie x

REVIEW: The Dark Artifices (series)

Quick Summary: Did someone say romance, demons and battle scenes?
Rating: ★★★☆☆
Try this series if you like: J.K Rowling, Sarah J Maas, Holly Black


Check out the full synopsis here

Demons, faeries, Shadowhunters, and a little bit of sizzle in the romance department – this would be an apt summary for most of Cassandra Clares writing. Indeed, The Dark Artifices series does not differ greatly from The Mortal Instruments or The Infernal Devices. There are obviously developments in the plot and the world-building, but overall if you like the Shadowhunter world, you will like this series. If you don’t, then you probably won’t.

The plot of this series is very good, with lots of twists and some interesting surprises. It begins at the of The Mortal Instruments and takes us through the lives of Emma Carstairs and Julian Blackthorn, friends of Jace and Clary and fellow Shadowhunters. We see more drama unfold for Shadowhunters, and once again the world as these young people know it threatens to come undone. This is a common theme for Clare’s plots, but I suppose if “it ‘aint broke, don’t fix it!”

Now, one thing I do really like about this series is the character building. One of my favourite parts is how Clare flips traditional male and female roles within the family. The clear example of this is Julian looks after the children, paints, and is very emotionally intelligent and available. Emma, however, loves fighting and is hell-bent on avenging her parents deaths. While these are not the only qualities these characters have, I do like how Clare reworks male and female stereotypes.

Another interesting talking point is the diversity within the characters in this series, and indeed in all of Clare’s writing. We have a bi-sexual couple, a transgender woman, a polyamorous relationship, hints at a gay relationship, a character on the autism spectrum, and the reversal of traditional masculine and feminine roles within a family. She gets it all in there. However, it does not feel like Clare is cramming in diversity for diversity’s sake. There is a wide range of people in these novels because there is a wide range of people in life. Clare is capturing a slice of humanity in her writing, and so of course there will be a whole range of different people. Being gay or Autistic is not the primary reason for the character’s existence; it is just a facet of their personality, and this makes these novels refreshing!

Overall, I find these books a bit of a slow read, but still enjoyable. If you are already into the Shadowhunters world, or like urban fantasy, then this is a good series for you. The character building is good, there are some fun and more devastating plot twists, and Clare is a great romance writer.

I would say that although you can be introduced to the Shadowhunters world for the first time with this series, I would recommend starting with either The Mortal Instruments or The Infernal Devices. 

Have you read any of Cassandra Clare’s books. Let us know what you think in the comments or on our Instagram!

Rosie x